One in five UK adults still incorrectly believe that dementia is an inevitable part of getting older 1 

  • The charity is on a mission to battle the serious misconception that dementia is an inevitability of old age. Its new ‘#ShareTheOrange’ campaign, featuring Samuel L. Jackson, highlights that physical diseases cause dementia, most commonly Alzheimer’s using an orange to symbolise the weight of matter lost in the brain as the condition develops. WATCH HERE.
  • The campaign runs during World Alzheimer’s Month, from 16 to 30 September.

West Lancashire MP Rosie Cooper is joining Alzheimer’s Research UK to call for greater awareness of dementia and the need for more research. The announcement comes ahead of World Alzheimer’s Day (Saturday 21 September) and as the charity launches a major new awareness campaign fronted by Samuel L. Jackson.

Despite dementia now being the UK’s leading cause of death, a recent poll found that 22% still incorrectly believe that dementia is an inevitable part of getting older. Alzheimer’s Research has joined forces with Samuel L. Jackson for the #ShareTheOrange campaign to highlight that physical diseases cause dementia using an orange to symbolise the weight of matter lost in the brain as the condition develops.

Diseases like Alzheimer’s are not a normal part of the ageing process. They are physical diseases that damage the brain. This is the message at the heart of Alzheimer’s Research UK’s Share the Orange campaign. In the campaign film, Samuel explains: “The damage to a brain with Alzheimer’s can leave it weighing 140g less than a healthy one. That’s about the weight of an orange…this shows us it is a physical disease…”

Samuel goes on to describe how: “dementia strikes at humanity’s most valuable resource, the cells of a human brain…it destroys these precious cells and the links between them.”

The #ShareTheOrange film ends with hope as Samuel L. Jackson states: “…with research we know diseases can be slowed, they can be stopped.” He calls on the public to share the film to “change the conversation and help Alzheimer’s Research UK make these breakthroughs possible for dementia”.

Samuel’s family has been impacted by Alzheimer’s more than most, having had six relatives diagnosed with the disease. He said: “It’s been proven from other diseases throughout history that where there is research, there can be a cure. Where there is research, there is hope. By sharing the knowledge that diseases like Alzheimer’s are not simply part and parcel of old age, we have the power to push research forward and put an end to this devastation. We must act now to speed up research towards breakthroughs.”

West Lancashire MP Rosie Cooper said:
“Dementia has such a great impact on the lives of those living with it and their family, friends and carers, the more research we can do now the sooner we can find the cure and better ways to mitigate its effects and support people to live well with dementia.”

Hilary Evans, Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Research UK, said:
“Research has made major breakthroughs in other disease areas in recent years and we can do the same for the diseases, like Alzheimer’s, that cause dementia. Our scientists are already making vital discoveries and with more support for their work, we can turn discoveries into life-changing breakthroughs more quickly.

“We’re calling on the public to #ShareTheOrange, turn fatalism into hope and make dementia the next big medical success story by backing Alzheimer’s Research UK’s world-leading research.”

The award-winning #ShareTheOrange campaign is in its third chapter for 2019; Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston supported the 2018 campaign, and the campaign debuted in 2016 with backing from former Doctor Who star Christopher Eccleston.

Alzheimer’s Research UK is the UK’s leading dementia research charity and last year pledged to commit a landmark £250m of funding towards pioneering medical research into the condition by 2025.

Dementia is the world’s greatest medical challenge, not only for the individuals affected and their families, but for society as a whole. Over 850,000 people in the UK have dementia, and the condition has an economic impact in the UK of over £26bn a year – more than cancer and heart disease combined.

1 Alzheimer’s Research UK Dementia Attitudes Monitor, 2018 – All interviews were carried out as part of Ipsos MORI’s regular face-to-face omnibus survey by Ipsos MORI interviewers in participants’ homes, using Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing (CAPI). A total of 2,361 interviews were conducted with adults aged 15 and over in the UK between 15th June and 5th July 2018. The face-to-face omnibus uses a rigorous sampling method to ensure a good geographical spread, using quotas for gender, age, working status and tenure to ensure that the sample is nationally representative.

  • Alzheimer’s Research UK is the UK’s leading charity specialising in finding preventions, treatments and a cure for dementia.
  • For our latest updates follow us on Twitter @AlzResearchUK
  • Our animation “What is dementia?” explains the essentials of dementia and the diseases that cause it youtube.com/watch?v=HobxLbPhrMc
  • We rely on donations to fund our vital dementia research. To help make breakthroughs possible, donate today by visiting alzheimersresearchuk.org or calling 0300 111 5555.
  • We are currently supporting pioneering dementia research projects worth nearly £34 million in leading Universities across the UK.
  • How can we challenge perceptions of dementia using only an orange? Find out more at alzheimersresearchuk.org/orange and help us share a better understanding about dementia. #ShareTheOrange
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